HOW TO BUY ART">HOW TO BUY ART

DOES ART HAVE TO MATCH THE SOFA?

Here’s help in how to buy art. No, it does­n’t need to match the sofa. You may have pur­chased a new home and want to dec­o­rate. Or you have have seen an art­work in a doc­tor’s office or art gallery and it cap­tured your atten­tion. Well good news. ART does not have to match your sofa. It only has to make you hap­py, remind you of good mem­o­ries or keep your interest.

If you are in the mar­ket for art (paint­ings, sculp­tures, one-of-a-kind fur­ni­ture, quilts, etc.), you only have to love it.  Sure, it should look appro­pri­ate in the room. But don’t think of fine art as just decor – because it isn’t, it is Fine Art and it should be expe­ri­enced as such.

    You can peruse art gal­leries, hope­ful­ly local art gal­leries, espe­cial­ly those owned by artists, like Hills­bor­ough Gallery of Arts in North Car­oli­na. If you are moved by a piece of fine art because it makes you hap­py, that is a good rea­son to buy It and take it home with you. That way, you would have the art to lift your spir­its every sin­gle day. Art is functional.

    You can always change lit­tle things in your room to make the art fit your decor. For instance, take col­ors from the art­work and bring in those col­ors with pil­lows, table cov­ers, anoth­er work of art or an accent rug.

    The art­works you choose do not need to match. There are no rules for choos­ing art accept pur­chase the art you love. The com­mon thread will be what they have in com­mon which is THAT YOU LOVE THEM. You don’t have to find the same col­ors, style or even the same time period.

     

    How to Com­bine Dif­fer­ent Styles

    Think out­side the box in arrang­ing art. For instance, a paint­ing does­n’t have to hang on a wall. It’s very bohemi­an to lean it on a man­tle or against the wall. Throw out the idea that items have to match. Jux­ta­po­si­tion makes things inter­est­ing. Mix round and square sculp­tures or high and low art­works. Find some­thing they have in com­mon to bring dif­fer­ent styles togeth­er. It can be col­or, sub­ject mat­ter or loca­tions. Group art. Hang one large piece, with small­er pieces. Same with sculp­tures. Groups items with same themes or var­i­ous styles or sizes. To group pho­tographs, frame them all with the same style and col­or frame.

    Don’t be afraid to mix styles. That can add excite­ment and ener­gy to the space. If you have a large blank wall, cov­er it with an extra large paint­ing and it becomes a focal point, a show piece.

    And there are times when you should think ‘inside the box.’ Think of your jew­el­ry that you love, but don’t see it very much as it is hid­den in your jew­el­ry box. How about plac­ing it in a shad­ow box and enjoy it every day.

    Jew­el­ry by Ari­an­na Bara

     

    Orig­i­nal Art vs Prints

    Orig­i­nal art­work is a good way to add some­thing unique and last­ing to your home, but it can be more expen­sive than a print. If the orig­i­nal art is a paint­ing, it will be more lumi­nous that a print and the col­or more lus­cious. It may have a com­pli­men­ta­ry tex­ture as well that is part of it’s char­ac­ter that can’t be trans­lat­ed in a print. Three-dimen­sion­al art like sculp­tures may not suf­fer that same dif­fer­ence, but an orig­i­nal will be one-of-a-kind.

    In the end, the best way to buy and dec­o­rate with art is to buy what you love. Oh, and make sure it makes you smile and feel good.

     

     

     

     

    ~Jude Lobe

    RESURFACE">RESURFACE

    Resurfacing In The Aftermath Of 2020

    Jew­el­er Nell Chan­dler was inspired by the title. “I thought of the dif­fer­ent sur­faces I have used in my work and the new tech­niques and sur­faces I have been inspired to try with each annu­al show.  It also rep­re­sents how we have spent more than a year in a weird and dif­fer­ent uni­verse and how we don’t even know the way our lives will be “Resur­faced” once we tru­ly head back in. I found myself revis­it­ing pre­vi­ous sur­face tech­niques on my jew­el­ry and for fun I cre­at­ed a cou­ple of paint­ings on the sub­ject of resur­fac­ing our lives that I’m call­ing Going Back In.”

    For pot­ter Eve­lyn Ward this past year has been full of changes. “Last fall I under­went brain surgery to deal with a painful facial nerve con­di­tion. I am hap­py to report that the surgery was suc­cess­ful.” Work­ing with clay kept her ground­ed. “My time in the stu­dio, with its famil­iar dai­ly rit­u­als, was a refuge and helped to cen­ter and keep me focused on the work. Since return­ing to the stu­dio in Feb­ru­ary, I feel like I’m resur­fac­ing from those dark, murky waters. My head is clear­ing, the pain is gone, and I have renewed ener­gy. I am still work­ing with mono­print­ing but I have been exper­i­ment­ing with lay­er­ing under­glazes and find myself drawn to more sub­dued col­ors. I feel like the new work is qui­eter, using lay­ers to build up a more com­plex surface.”

    For painter Michele Yellin “This past year, dur­ing the pan­dem­ic, time has stood still. And yet some­how moved on. I lost my moth­er this year for the third time. First, I lost her to her advanc­ing demen­tia, then to the lock­down, and final­ly to her death from Covid-19. I mourn. I paint. I think. I paint. I remem­ber. I paint. I dream. I mourn. I paint. I resur­face, back to the light, and I paint.”

    Resur­face will run both online and in the gallery from May 28 through June 20.

    ONLINE open­ing: May 28th, 12 Noon. CLICK IMAGE TO VISIT ONLINE  OPENING.

    GALLERY Open­ing Recep­tion: Fri­day, May 28th, 6–9 pm.

     

    SENSE OF WONDER Exhibit Came To Be">How the SENSE OF WONDER Exhibit Came To Be

    How the SENSE OF WONDER Exhibit Came To Be

    Jew­el­er Ari­an­na Bara, wood sculp­tor Lar­ry Favorite and painter Eduar­do Lapeti­na have spent the pan­dem­ic think­ing about their rela­tion­ship to the world and their art. This new show is the result of all the time alone in the studio.

    For jew­el­er Ari­an­na Bara the events of these days, filled with both wor­ry and hope, have led to a sense of won­der. “As my world has shrunk, I spend time explor­ing the small­est worlds I have access to and find a uni­verse in the land of moss­es and lichens in the woods, to the bright greens, the tex­tures, the vari­ety of leaves and ten­drils. That  excite­ment car­ries over to the nat­ur­al beau­ty found in fos­sils and stones like Aus­tralian boul­der opals, which begin as rivers of sil­i­ca flow­ing through chan­nels in rock and become beau­ti­ful­ly unpre­dictable in the vari­ety and inten­si­ties of their col­ors. In cre­at­ing jew­el­ry with these fruits of the earth I hope to com­mu­ni­cate that same won­der to the wearer.”

    For wood sculp­tor Lar­ry Favorite this has been an extra­or­di­nary year. “Due to the pan­dem­ic, I have spent long days in my stu­dio, with only a pile of desert iron­wood, tiny bits of turquoise, sheets of ster­ling sil­ver, and my imag­i­na­tion to keep me com­pa­ny. To pro­duce a fin­ished piece of art I must slow down my breath­ing, nar­row my field of vision and steady my hands. As a result, mak­ing my art has the capac­i­ty to calm both my body and my mind. These pieces high­light the endur­ing qual­i­ty of iron­wood, enhanced by a com­bi­na­tion of flow­ing abstract designs and sim­ple images drawn from nature. They are meant to com­mu­ni­cate a sense of famil­iar­i­ty, reas­sur­ance, and heal­ing. I hope you are as calmed by look­ing at these pieces as I was by mak­ing them.”

    Painter Eduar­do Lapeti­na writes: “Forced by the pan­dem­ic, I was in iso­la­tion, most­ly work­ing in my stu­dio. It was an oppor­tu­ni­ty to con­nect with the out­side world through my paint­ings. I want­ed the present work to be the cat­a­lyst to rethink the sig­nif­i­cance of our future and to stim­u­late ideas and dia­logue. To have a fresh out­look with an explo­sion of vibrant col­ors, impact­ful tex­tures and mes­sages of hope. I want my jour­ney in art to be a nat­ur­al orches­tra­tion of my expe­ri­ences and emotions.”